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Moroccan Chicken Stew with Apricots and Root Vegetables

Made this for dinner tonight and it came out delicious so I thought I would share. It’s full of fall/winter veggies, quite healthy, and under 500 calories per serving. Yay for eating delicious and healthy.

It’s my personal adaptation of a similar recipe on epicurious.com…

Servings: Makes 4 servings.

Ingredients

2 teaspoons ground cumin
2 tablespoons dried thyme
4 skinless boneless chicken breasts
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 large onion, chopped
3 garlic cloves, minced
1 large baking potato, peeled and diced

I large sweet potato, peeled and diced

1 cup dried apricots
1 14 ounce can diced tomatoes with green chile

¾ cup white wine [we use the cheap wine in a box]
1 teaspoon cardamom
3 whole cloves

1/4 -1/2 stick of butter

Garlic salt and pepper

Preparation

Mix cumin and thyme in small bowl. Sprinkle chicken with spice mixture, then salt and pepper. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add onions; sauté until golden, about 5 minutes. Add garlic; stir 1 minute. Push onion mixture to side of skillet. Add remaining oil to skillet. Add chicken and cook until beginning to brown, about 1 1/2 minutes per side. Scatter onion mixture, potatoes and apricots over chicken. Pour canned tomatoes with juices over and add wine; bring to boil. Stir in cardamom and cloves. Drop in ¼ stick of butter to marry the flavors. Reduce heat to medium-low; cover and simmer until chicken and vegetables are tender, about 40 minutes. Season with garlic salt and pepper and rest of butter [optional] to taste. Serve in pasta bowls with a hearty loaf of bread.

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