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Swiss Chard and Parsnip Soup

Adapted from a recipe of the same name published in Oxygen Magazine in June 2010. My version adds white wine, spices and a bit of butter. Made this for dinner last night and it was fabulous. A really good way to sneak in greens for husbands/kids who are anti-veggie. Over 100% of vitamin A and over 600% of vitamin K. Fantastic!

2 T olive oil

1 large onion, chopped

2 cloves garlic, minced

1/2 cup white wine

2 T butter

3 parsnips, peeled and thinly sliced

4 cups chicken stock

1 bunch Swiss chard, rinsed, stems trimmed, chopped

2 T balsamic vinegar

1/2 cup skim milk

1 tsp caraway seed

1/2 tsp ground celery seed

sea salt and pepper to taste

1. Salt the onions and saute them in olive oil over medium heat until soft. Remember to heat the pan first, then add the oil, then add the onions once the oil is hot.

2. Add garlic and parsnips and saute for 5 minutes or until parsnips are golden. Add wine and cook until most of wine is evaporated. Add butter.

3. Add stock then bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer for 25 minutes until parsnips are soft. If  soup has reduced from boiling, add more water to return to original quantity.

4. Add swiss chard and let wilt, about 2 minutes. Add vinegar, milk, salt, pepper, caraway and celery.

5. Use and immersion blender to puree until smooth.

Serve with fresh bread. Approx 250 calories per bowl.

Comments

Andrew Opala said…
definitely something to try!

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