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My Tamale Recipe

 

This is an adaptation of a Bobby Flay recipe that I integrated with the recipe from the side of my masa mix bag. Makes perfect, moist, delicious tamales every time. Foulproof! Recipe doubles easily to make 32 tamales. Make extra and freeze the leftovers- you’ll be glad you did.

Recipe:

2 cups instant masa

2 cups chicken broth

1 t baking powder

½ t salt

2/3 cup Crisco

2 T butter

1 medium onion

1 cup corn kernels

1.5 t sugar

Salt and pepper

36 corn husks

5 or 6 Hatch green chiles, finely diced

1/2 bag shredded Mexican cheese

2 chicken breasts, cooked and shredded or finely chopped

Clean and soak the corn husks in hot water for at least an hour before you begin the tamales.

Puree the corn, onion, and broth together in blender. Transfer to mixing bowl and cut in butter and shortening. Using your fingers mix in the masa, sugar, and salt and pepper to taste. Mix until there are no more visible lumps of shortening and dough comes together- DO NOT OVERMIX.

Remove the corn husks from water, 2 at a time to wrap tamales. Overlap the widest part of the husks and put a spoonful of tamale mix on the husks. Put about a teaspoon of chicken+chile+cheese total (1/3 teaspoon each) on top and then put a little more tamale mix on top to cover. Wrap/twist husks around filling as if you were gift wrapping a Pringles can and then use thin strips torn from a spare husk to tie little knots around the ends of the wrapped tamales. Should look like this:

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Stack tamales in a steamer basket over boiling water and steam until tamales are cooked through- usually 2+ hours. You will need to add more water to the pot periodically. Make sure the pot doesn’t boil dry and burn your house down!

Comments

awakeunderappls said…
Well, this is very nice of you to share.

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