Skip to main content

c25k: w2d2 DONE

Can I just write again how much I love having the Garmin FR60 as a ‘partner’ for my sessions? It is really exciting to track HR (especially as my cardio fitness improves), calories, distance, speed, and pace.

Midway through the week of workouts and my peak and avg HR during the workout has gone down, despite an increase in running time over last week. My heart is getting stronger! I am beginning to feel as if I can hold a conversation during the jogging segments, which is great cardio progress.

Here are my technical stats for this session: Garmin Connect

I ran this morning’s session in haymarket at 7:30am, making laps around the fields on the grounds of an elementary school across the street from Literary Elly May’s home.

One more session for w2 to go (on Sat) and then I graduate to week three which means 3 minute runs. Truth be told I am a bit panicked about increasing from 1.5 minutes to 3, but will give it my best shot.

This is probably my first go in all my life with sticking with something I wasn’t naturally great at from the outset and practicing to get better and I have to say it is exciting. I’ve always operated under my Dad’s “wisdom”  of only embracing tasks and activities I am gifted in. Some sort of wacky division of labor/specialization for efficiency theory he fixed in his mind and took to illogical extremes. What it meant in practical terms was that I had to drop out of dance classes as a kid b/c I showed no aptitude for dancing. It meant my Dad never came to my softball games the year I played because we lost the first 3 and he deemed it a waste of his time and a mismatch between my talents and chosen activities. I think it is the right time in my life (all 34 years of it) to ditch his cockamamie theory and put myself out there and try things that I *want* to try. And if it turns out I’m not so good at the outset it I won’t worry about looking stupid or “being inefficient with my talent”. Instead I will practice, working to get better, so long as I am interested in pursuing the activity and if it turns out I am really lousy even with practice THAT’S OK. I give myself permission to enjoy things, even if I’m not so good at them (super happy bonus though if I turn out to be good at them with some practice).

This is America - land of bravery and freedom. This is not old school Europe where we cast people in chosen roles and tasks based on aptitude testing and confine/consign them to those roles indefinitely.

Comments

Ojoru said…
Thanks Jenny for your words of encouragement:) And thanks for sharing what helps give you additional motivation. Visited your blog. Very nice! I got to know a little more about you:) Well, did W2D3 today and so I'm done with week 2-Yay! I'm also a little nervous about W3. I'll give it a shot though. If I find I'm struggling too much, I'll repeat week 2. Wishing you the best as you strive to meet your goal. Remember to take it a day at a time...
Ojoru
Connie said…
Jenni,
So glad to find your blog, and I truly enjoyed reading it. You are an excellent writer! I am starting W1D1 Monday. Always been a couch potato, but I did recently join the gym. I try to go 3 or 4 times a week, but like you, have trouble sticking with anything that I'm not naturally good at. Running is at the top of the list of things I don't like, but suddenly feel the urge to do. So...thanks to you, a couple of other bloggers, and the C25K page on Facebook, I am going to become a runner at the ripe ol' age of 46, weighing in at a fluffy 192 lbs. Oh, by the way, you are the only one I've shared that number with besides my daughter & sister. My main goal is to be healthy. I am 3 years from the age of my dad when he had his 1st heart attack, and I see scary similarities in how he lived then, and how I live now. So...changes are taking place. Your blog is one of my new inspirations! Keep up the great work...YOU CAN & WILL DO IT!
Connie

Popular posts from this blog

Board Game Review: Brass Birmingham

Here’s a story of a lovely lady (spoiler: it’s me) and her pride and how it has led to the discovery of the single greatest board game I have ever played. It’s probably also a good primer for other reviewers on increasing your reach. At GenCon this year, I was perusing the wares of the various booths and my eyes caught a glimpse of two beautiful game boxes. Each had crisp metallic lettering with an old world feel and artwork that radiated European class. I made my way to the booth and waited patiently to speak to to the team manning it as there were many buyers lined up to purchase the games. I didn’t know anything about the games (Brass Birmingham and Brass Lancashire), or the publisher – Roxley Game Laboratory – but I knew I wanted to review one or both of the games. Almost every board game love story I star in in can be summed up this way: I am seduced by the artwork or theme and then I stay for the right mechanics. When the lead rep spoke with me, he gently rejected my request. He

Board Game Review: Hues and Cues

Last week we received Hues and Cues from The Op Games. We recently finished playing through Scooby-Doo Escape from the Haunted Mansion (a fantastic game in The Op Games catalogue designed by Jay Cormier, Sen-Foong Lim, and Kami Mandell that you should absolutely pick up to play with your family) and wanted to give another game from the same publisher a go. I picked Hues and Cues because I’ve been pleasantly surprised by other “test whether our minds think the same way” games such as The Mind   and Wavelength. In Hues and Cues , players gather around a large central board comprised of 480 graduating colors of the rainbow surrounded by an x-y axis and scoring table. White and black (which are technically not colors) are conspicuously absent as are shades (mixtures of color + black; e.g., grey) and tints (mixtures of color + white; e.g., cream).  On each player’s turn, they draw a card with four colors and the x-y axis codes of those colors depicted and they select one. They are in the

Board Game Review: Beyond the Sun

Almost a decade after my interest was first sparked in reviewing games for Rio Grande Games, I finally met someone on the inside of the company in a mutual FB industry group and made a connection. Soon after, a review copy of Beyond the Sun by Dennis K. Chan was at my door. Game Reviewing as a Hobby: A Peak Behind the Scenes I have always had a soft spot for Rio Grande Games. I spent part of my childhood growing up in New Mexico, and graduated from New Mexico State University, where the actual Rio Grande itself was practically in my backyard. Because of my time in the area, I really enjoy supporting New Mexico businesses. So there's that. And the first "serious" board game I ever played was the Rio Grande distribution of Power Grid, which is still one of my favorites. We own over 30 games from the Rio Grande catalog, including Dominion, Puerto Rico, Carcassonne, Race for the Galaxy (another favorite), Stone Age, Underwater Cities (this game is amazeballs), and more.