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Weekend Activities

It was a very full weekend around our household. Friday I prepped and executed a birthday party for Literary Elly May. It was her 27th and we employed a zombie theme for the event. It was nice to have all her friends join us to celebrate.

Saturday I led my walking meetup (NoVA Walkers) on a moderately challenging 6.8 mile hike in the Shenandoah Natl Park. We hiked Piney River Falls with a group of 8 and stopped for lunch once we reached the falls. The trail configuration is out-and-back, with a 3.4 mile decline down the valley to the falls and likewise 3.4 mile incline return. My recent running program has dramatically improved my cardio so I had no difficulties on the return section with breathing. However, despite my  muscle building (also thanks to running) it was clearly not enough to prepare me for a trail with this kind of protracted incline because although I was fine during the hike, I was very sore all day Sunday. Still, it was great to get out there and rise to the challenge and improve myself.

Sunday we went to church (heard the new pastor give an impromptu sermon) and then in the afternoon headed for the cinema to see Inception. The movie was fantastic! Spoiler alert: you may not want to read the next paragraph if you haven’t seen the movie yet and plan to.

I felt pretty confident early in the movie, based on the subtext and detailed clues (in the form of Cobb’s insights on how you tell you are in a dream) that Cobb was dreaming the entire time. It seemed obvious to me that it was in the same vein as  The Others or The Sixth Sense where the main character does not realize that the joke’s on them (so to speak). When the movie was concluded I was surprised to find that some viewers felt he hadn’t been dreaming the whole time and that other viewers took an agnostic stance stating that we can never know for sure either way. These differing opinions seemed to rob me of my victory in figuring out a plot early in the film (which happens so rarely I might add that I cherish each time I am blessed with such insights), and agitated me. So much so that hubby and I had a huge debate over the matter on the car ride home that got pretty heated.

Overall it was a good weekend, although I had several items on my to do list that I never got to which will need to be crammed in today.

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